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Making Miso from Soy Beans – We’re all go!

January 18, 2015
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Japanese miso paste

Japanese miso paste

winter-seasonA couple of weeks back we announced that we had received a DIY Miso making pack in preparation for our trek back into Japanese tradition and the ancient techniques of preparing this unique Japanese food. (The earlier story is here).

The DIY Miso kit was purchased from a special Miso manufacturing company called “Komego“, located in Fukui, Japan.  (At this stage, the company only supplies the kits to customers within Japan and website and all kit instructions are only written in Japanese.)

A complete step-by-step guide to how we made our Miso paste is provided here. We will update this guide as we continue fermentation and eventually re-mix and finally eat the Miso later in the year.

Japanese are usually very particular about the differing types and tastes of foods as produced by specialist regions of Japan.  Miso products are no different.  Various types of Miso can be produced with the taste depending on the origin of specific ingredients and the specific regional preparation techniques employed to make the paste. Read more »

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Making Miso from Soy Beans (Part 1) – Received our DIY kit.

January 10, 2015
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misobucketwinter-seasonToday at HomeDIYStuff.com, we received a project pack for making our own Miso.  Miso is a very healthy, traditional food in Japan.  It is a fermented bean paste that is extremely important in the everyday diets of most Japanese.  A wide variety of miso pastes are used in Miso soup, ramen (noodle) soup, as condiment and in general, in an extremely wide selection of other everyday foods.

Miso paste takes many months to make as it is made from the gradual yeast fermentation of Soy beans.  When prepared and left to to sit over time, the bean paste takes on the consistency of something resembling Peanut Butter … but obviously with a considerably different taste! 

The paste adds a relatively a strong, distinctive Japanese taste and pungent oriental fragrance to dishes. The manufacture of Miso paste is quite an art and flavors can vary greatly depending on the Soy beans used and techniques used to make paste.  It varies from quite a light taste with a soft yellow color, to thick and strong taste with a dark tan color.

Unfortunately, traditional home made Miso paste has gone somewhat like that of DIY jam making in other countries.  Die hards still do make it, but for the vast, busy majority, it is usually cheaper and far more convenient to simply purchase commercially made brands from the supermarket.

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Etching DIY Circuit Boards (PCB)

November 29, 2014
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PCB Screen PrintingElectronics hobbyists who have never ventured into the realms of making their own circuit boards, are missing out on half the fun.  Here, we present a quick step-by-step guide to the UV light transfer and Ferric Chloride etching method for making your own printed circuit boards.

Home DIY electronics projects can be a lot of fun for discovery and learning.  They can also be extremely useful for those  extra buttons and remote devices in your home.

What is even better, is being able sit the project components on a printed circuit board (PCB) that you also made yourself.

It is extremely satisfying seeing a finished DIY electronics project which looks so professional it could have just as easily come from the nearest electronics store.  Learning the skill of etching your own PCBs will help you obtain that same satisfaction in your home electronics projects too.

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Looking Inside a Lead Acid Battery

November 21, 2014
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lead acid car battery cut awayHere’s something just for interest’s sakes.  Photos of a modern, but humble lead acid car battery and its internal electrode plate arrangements for those who may not have seen similar before.

Common lead acid batteries in cars and trucks work by developing and storing electric potential between sets of positive and negative electrode plates.  The electrodes are commonly made of Lead (Pb) and Lead Dioxide (PbO2) mesh and paste, separated by a non-conductive porous material to stop them touching and short circuiting.  The battery cells are submerged in approximately 35% Sulphuric Acid (H2SO4(aq)) which acts as an electrolyte and allows electrons to flow between the plates and to deliver current when the battery terminals are connected to a circuit.

The basic energy storage and delivery concept of lead acid batteries was invented over a century and a half ago by French physicist Gaston Planté.  Since that time, this kind of battery chemistry has been developed to become a standard and efficient workhorse in everyday life for us all.

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Japanese Miso – DIY Fermentation Project Complete

November 20, 2014
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winter-season

DIY Japanese Miso Cracker Dip

We have completed the fermentation of our DIY Japanese Miso Paste from raw soy beans.  The Miso making was a great success.

Many readers could be forgiven for reacting with an “Eeuuuwwwww!” upon seeing some of the photos of this process, but believe us, the final miso paste product is extremely tasty.  And healthy too!

It has been almost a full year since we started making our paste. The fermentation started in cold Winter months early in the year, soon after when we first discussed home DIY miso making. We later provided a full DIY how-to of miso making guide” when we started the mix, where we showed the ingredients required in the preparation and the techniques used.

Time has flown by. We provided a half year report on the progress of our fermentation project when the soy bean paste received a good mixing just prior to the arrival of Summer’s full heat. At the time, being exposed to only cool temperatures, little had changed in our premature miso paste and there wasn’t even a thread of flavor altering mold to be seen.

Given five extra months of development and an a blast of Japanese Summer heat in between, and that all changed!

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Home DIY Electrostatic Powder Coating

November 2, 2014
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Electrostatic Powder Coating Spray Unit

DIY electrostatic powder coating requires some upfront investment in workshop equipment, but the surface coating results are worth every cent!

brush-100x100We can’t rave enough about electrostatic powder coating in our DIY workshop.

Why? Because even when most liquid paints let us down completely, electrostatic powder coat paints consistently give our metal DIY parts and projects an extremely professional looking finish.

There are no spray cans, liquid solvents or messy paint brushes involved in powder coating.

The paint is supplied as a dry, finely milled powder and applied using a specially designed electrostatic spray gun.

The array of powder coat colors available, with finishes, metallic effects and textures to suit any DIY project desire or need, is stunning. Powder coated finishes are quality coatings which are thick, vibrant and extremely scratch resistant.  They last!

With powder coating equipment available, a fully protective dimpled coating in an exotically wild metallic red or green color over a metal surface is simple to achieve – whether with or without an holographic like lustre! As is a a more conservative, yet very professional looking coating of silky matte black.

The ability to spray this level of coating quality at home expands all sorts of DIY project horizons.

Unlike liquid paints, powder paint can be applied evenly in one shoot without the risk of dripping or sagging. Over spray can be easily swept up and re-used.

Following a paint shoot, the coating is cured by heat treatment. Then, after just 20 minutes in a workshop oven …. the job is done!  The parts are good to go!
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DIY Powder Coating Glasses Frames

October 23, 2014
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DIY Powder Coating Reading GlassesNo matter how good glasses frames look when first selected from the optician’s display rack, the surface design and coating inevitably chips and rubs off over time.

Fashions also change and those ‘hip’ frames we bought a while back, although still functional, often just aren’t ‘with it’ any longer.

That’s where home DIY electrostatic powder coating comes in handy!

Powder coat painting techniques are perfect for quickly revitalising run down steel framed reading glasses.  A huge array of powder coat paints on the market are capable of producing a stunning range of vibrant colors and textures.

With the right DIY workshop equipment, powder coating techniques produce results with many benefits over normal paint application techniques.

It is quick to apply; quick to oven cure and is as tough as nails forever and a day after that.

It took us less than two hours in the home DIY workshop to strip down, prepare and completely transform an old, yet favorite pair of beaten metal framed reading glasses into something new, fresh and exciting to wear.

After completing our DIY frame revitalization project, the glasses looked great!

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